Services

Tank Management
UST Compliance Inspection
UST Tightness Testing Coordination
UST Closure – Tank Removal, Excavation Assessment, and Reporting
UST Closure-in-Place
UST System Design and Installation Coordination
AST Installation Coordination
Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plans
AST Removal and Bulk Plant Decommissioning
           
Site Investigation
Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment
Phase 2 Environmental Site Assessment
Subsurface Investigation
Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)

Soil and Groundwater Remediation
Remediation System Design
Remedial Construction Management
Remediation System Evaluation, Operation, and Maintenance

Regulatory Compliance Services
Groundwater Monitoring
Report Review and Regulatory Status Appraisal
Site Mapping and Drafting Services

Excess Liability Trust Fund
Excess Liability Trust Fund

 UST Compliance Inspection
State and federal regulations that became effective in 1988 require all underground storage tank (UST) systems to be replaced or fully upgraded (with release detection, corrosion protection, and spill/overfill prevention) by December 1998.  Owners and operators of new or upgraded USTs are required to keep detailed records on tank registrations, repairs, upgrades, inventory logs, release detection, and cathodic protection.  These records must be kept on-site and available for inspection by state regulators.  Although enforcement of UST compliance and recordkeeping requirements varies from state to state, it is likely that regulatory oversight will increase.

Creek Run can evaluate your UST compliance status and develop recommendations for meeting regulatory requirements at minimum cost.  A compliance evaluation begins with an on-site inspection of your UST system, a review of your UST records, and an interview to assess your current recordkeeping practices.  Based on results of these tasks, a letter report will be prepared to document the current status of your UST system, recommend specific actions to correct any deficiencies, and provide a budgetary cost estimate for correcting deficiencies.

As always, a Creek Run professional will be available to discuss our evaluation and recommendations for keeping you in full compliance with UST requirements.  Creek Run can also assist with implementing recommendations, coordinating ongoing UST system compliance-related maintenance, and providing recordkeeping support.
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UST Tightness Testing Coordination
Although state regulations require yearly UST and line tightness tests, regular tightness testing makes good business sense to protect your inventory investment, identify leaks quickly, and maintain an uninterrupted paper trail proving that fuel was not released from your system.  However, these important tests can easily be pushed back or forgotten entirely in day-to-day operation of a fast-paced business.  Creek Run can provide worry-free coordination to ensure that tightness tests are conducted at appropriate times at your facility.  Creek Run experts can interpret tightness test data, explain test results in understandable language, and notify you immediately of any discrepancies.  Creek Run maintains a group of qualified tank and line testing subcontractors to provide these services at the most economic price.
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UST Closure – Tank Removal, Excavation Assessment, and Reporting
Creek Run has extensive experience with closing UST systems, both closure-by-removal and closure-in-place.  Once a thorough understanding of UST system components is acquired, Creek Run will prepare pre-closure notification documents and forward them to the appropriate regulatory agencies.  During the notification waiting period (usually 30 days), Creek Run will determine client expectations with regard to disposal of any impacted materials encountered, prepare detailed bid specifications, and solicit quotes from a minimum of three (3) qualified excavation subcontractors.  Following subcontractor selection, the work will be scheduled and performed within the time frame designated by the client.

All UST closure operations are conducted by OSHA 40-hour HAZWOPER-trained subcontractors under the direct supervision of experienced Creek Run personnel.  Closure-by-removal typically begins with saw-cutting and removal of pavement and soil above the tanks.  The tanks are then ventilated, residual product and sludge are removed, and the interior of the tanks are cleaned prior to proper off-site disposal.  Product lines, vent lines, and associated piping are removed, cleaned, and properly disposed.

Following tank and line removal, an excavation zone assessment is conducted.  Soil and groundwater samples are collected from appropriate locations in accordance with applicable state guidelines, screened for organic vapors in the field using a photoionization detector (PID), flame ionization detector (FID), or combustible vapor meter, and preserved for laboratory analysis.  Field observations and recommendations regarding the presence or absence of impacted soil or groundwater are discussed with the client prior to excavation backfilling, compacting, and paving.

Within 30 days of UST removal, Creek Run will prepare a UST Closure and Site Assessment Report.  The report will provide all information required by the applicable regulatory agency, including laboratory analytical results, disposal documents, and conclusions regarding the presence or absence of impacted materials. 
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UST Closure-in-Place
UST closure-in-place typically requires pre-approval by the applicable regulatory agency following receipt of soil sampling results.  A pre-closure report documenting laboratory analytical results of soil samples collected from borings adjacent to the UST area, an explanation why the USTs could not be closed-by-removal, and a description of specific closure-in-place procedures and materials is usually required.  Upon receipt of regulatory approval, Creek Run will prepare detailed specifications and acquire bids from several subcontractors to remove accessible piping, fill the UST(s) with inert material (usually sand or a cement/bentonite slurry), and pave or re-seed any surface openings.
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UST System Design and Installation Coordination
Since 1993, Creek Run has coordinated installation of numerous UST systems in Indiana and adjacent states.  Creek Run can take your architect/engineer’s design and acquire the necessary permits and clearances required by local and state regulatory agencies.  During the regulatory review process, Creek Run will prepare detailed specifications and solicit multiple bids to complete your project.  Over the years, Creek Run has developed excellent working relationships with area equipment providers and specialized subcontractors to ensure trouble-free installation of UST systems.  Following equipment and subcontractor selection and receipt of necessary permits, continuous on-site supervision will be provided during the project by Creek Run personnel skilled in UST installation operations.  The on-site Creek Run supervisor can provide verbal or written progress reports in accordance with your requirements (i.e. daily, weekly, or on call).  The entire UST installation process will be fully documented in a summary report submitted within 30 days of completion of the project.
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AST Installation Coordination
In coordination with your architect or engineer, Creek Run can acquire the permits and clearances necessary for installing new above ground storage tank (AST) systems.  Based on design drawings, Creek Run will solicit quotes from several pre-qualified subcontractors and equipment vendors and supervise all phases of the installation project.  Written or verbal progress reports will be provided as requested throughout the project and full documentation of installation operations will be provided at the conclusion of the project.
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Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plans
Facilities that operate a single AST with a storage capacity greater than 660 gallons or multiple tanks with a combined capacity greater than 1,320 gallons are required to have Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) plans.  SPCC plans outline operating procedures for AST systems, contingency plans in the event of a release, and various technical requirements such as corrosion protection.  Creek Run has prepared SPCC plans for small and medium-size bulk storage facilities throughout Indiana.  Please contact us to discuss your operations and obtain a free estimate for preparing a SPCC plan for your facility.
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AST Removal and Bulk Plant Decommissioning
Creek Run has successfully decommissioned numerous bulk fuel and chemical storage plants in central and northern Indiana.  Work activities performed during decommissioning projects, which vary according to client objectives, typically include cleaning, removal, and proper disposal of ASTs, piping, loading racks, and associated product storage, containment, and distribution equipment.  Following removal of storage equipment, Creek Run will ensure the surface of the former storage area is restored (paved, seeded, etc.) in accordance with client specifications.  Upon request, Creek Run can design and implement a confirmatory sampling program to determine if any leakage of product has occurred and provide recommendations based on field observations or sampling results. 
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Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA)
A Phase I ESA, typically required by a potential buyer or lender prior to conclusion of a transfer of ownership, is conducted to identify areas of potential environmental concern at a commercial property.  Creek Run prepares Phase I ESA following ASTM Standard E1527-00.  A Phase I ESA consists of three (3) main components: acquisition and evaluation of historical records and owner/operator questionnaires; site inspection; and preparation of a written report.

Historical records reviewed during a Phase I ESA include historical aerial photographs, city directories, property cards, Sanborn fire insurance maps (if available), and comprehensive environmental databases maintained by commercial vendors.  Site history information may also be collected from current and past property owners via interviews and questionnaires.

A site inspection will be preformed by an experienced Creek Run professional.  Based on historical property usage, areas of environmental concern may include piping or tanks associated with UST or AST systems, unmarked containers (drums, buckets, cans, tanks), discolored soil or pavement, stressed vegetation, wastewater treatment equipment (septic tanks, leach fields, sumps, dry wells, separators), monitoring wells, dump areas, surface impoundments (pits, ponds, lagoons, unidentified depressions), obvious signs of chemical spills or residues, large electrical equipment (transformers, capacitors) with oil that may contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and asbestos-containing materials (ACM). 

A Phase I ESA report will be prepared upon conclusion of the historical review and site inspection.  The report will be prepared using the following general format:

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Phase II Environmental Site Assessment (ESA)
A Phase II ESA is an investigation to confirm the presence or absence of contaminated materials on a property.  Typically, a Phase II ESA is conducted to further investigate specific areas of concern identified during a Phase I ESA.  Following review of the Phase I ESA and other available site information, a concise Phase II ESA scope of work is developed to ensure all areas of potential concern are properly assessed and client needs are fully addressed.  A Phase II ESA may involve:

Once the Phase II ESA scope of work has been approved, an experienced Creek Run project manager will complete sample collection and analysis tasks and prepare a confidential report in the required timeframe.  At a minimum, a Phase II ESA report will include a site map, a narrative description of sampling and analysis procedures, tabulated analytical results, analytical results plotted on a site map, and conclusions regarding the presence or absence of contaminated materials in areas of concern.  If impacted materials are identified, recommendations for further assessment and a summary of pertinent regulatory requirements will be provided in the Phase II ESA report or under separate cover.
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Subsurface Investigation
Creek Run has performed hundreds of subsurface investigations to define the nature and extent of soil and groundwater impacted by petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated solvents, heavy metals, and other potentially hazardous chemicals.  A subsurface investigation is usually required by state regulatory agencies after the presence of impacted materials has been confirmed by Phase II ESA or UST closure results.  A successful subsurface investigation depends on a thorough understanding of applicable regulatory requirements, soil conditions that influence contaminant migration, and client objectives.

The extent of impacted soil is delineated by collecting soil samples for field screening and potential laboratory analysis using a Geoprobe direct push system or a split spoon sampler advanced through hollow stem augers.  The extent of impacted groundwater can be delineated by collecting discrete grab samples from open boreholes or temporary wells placed in Geoprobe or auger borings.  Once a detailed scope of work for the investigation has been determined, Creek Run will obtain bids from at least three (3) drilling subcontractors to minimize overall project costs.  If off-site sampling is required to accomplish project objectives, Creek Run can prepare the necessary documents and secure written access approval to adjacent properties.

Field sampling activities are conducted under the direct supervision of experienced, OSHA 40-hour HAZWOPER-trained Creek Run personnel.  Soil and groundwater samples are processed by the Creek Run professional in accordance with the applicable regulatory requirements.  Strict chain-of-custody and Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) procedures are followed to guarantee sample integrity.  Creek Run utilizes a select group of National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference (NELAC) certified laboratories to ensure reliable analytical results and cost effectiveness.

If required by state or federal guidelines, Creek Run can design a groundwater monitoring network and supervise installation of monitoring wells to characterize groundwater flow and contaminant conditions.  Typically, groundwater samples collected from temporary wells during initial investigation activities are evaluated to optimize the locations of semi-permanent monitoring wells in order to define the extent of impacted groundwater using the minimum number of wells.  Based on a detailed scope of work, Creek Run will prepare detailed specifications and solicit quotes from qualified, OSHA 40-hour HAZWOPER-trained drilling subcontractors.  As always, experienced Creek Run personnel supervise all phases of monitoring well installation and development.

At the conclusion of sampling and analysis activities, Creek Run will prepare a complete, concise report documenting all phases of the investigation.  Creek Run has prepared Initial Site Characterization (ISC), Further Site Investigation (FSI), Initial Investigation Report (IIR), Phase II Investigation Work Plan, and Phase II Investigation reports under the following regulatory programs:

Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM)

Ohio Bureau of Underground Storage Tank Regulations (BUSTR)
Kentucky Division of Waste Management – Underground Storage Tank Branch
Illinois Environmental Protection Agency – Bureau of Land
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Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)
Creek Run now has the ability to accurately locate and determine depths of subsurface entities without having to dig or drill. Creek Run uses a Sensors and Software Noggin® Smart Cart Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) unit equipped with a 250 MHZ antenna.

Using GPR we can:

Ground penetrating radar is a very useful tool and provides key information for the planning and execution of subsurface investigations.
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Remediation System Design
Creek Run has designed and installed numerous remediation systems to address soil and groundwater impacted by petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs – free product), and heavy metals.  Based on a thorough understanding of soil properties, contaminant distribution, and hydrogeologic conditions gained during subsurface investigation activities, Creek Run evaluates a variety of remedial approaches to identify the most appropriate remedial method(s) for addressing site-specific conditions and achieving regulatory closure at minimum cost.

At some lightly to moderately impacted sites, the most appropriate remedial approach may involve periodic sampling to track contaminant concentrations over time and, if a stable or decreasing plume can be demonstrated, a monitoring-only remedial approach may be appropriate.  In some cases, regulatory closure using health-risk based cleanup goals can be obtained by documenting the absence of complete exposure pathways from the source to potential receptors.  At some heavily impacted sites or sites where complete exposure pathways may exist, aggressive remediation using an engineered treatment system may be needed to minimize the potential for exposure and reduce contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels. 

If active remediation is warranted, Creek Run will conduct pilot tests to identify the most effective remedial method and acquire information needed to design a full scale remediation system.   Pilot testing typically involves installation of test wells, followed by field tests ranging in duration from a few hours to several days.  Data gathered during pilot testing is evaluated to assess contaminant removal efficiency and equipment requirements for a full scale system.  Creek Run has extensive experience in pilot testing, test interpretation, and full scale system design for the following remedial methods:

Air sparging
Soil vapor extraction
Dual and multiple phase extraction
Bioventing
Biosparging

Creek Run routinely performs aquifer pumping tests, slug tests, and soil permeability analyses to quantify basic soil and bedrock properties that control groundwater flow and contaminant migration.  During remedial feasibility testing, Creek Run has utilized GFLOW groundwater flow modeling software to simulate the effects of groundwater extraction and infiltration of treated water.  Commercially available fate and transport modeling software has been utilized to quantify exposure risks by predicting the rate of contaminant migration and degradation at several petroleum-impacted sites. 

Creek Run has prepared and received approval for corrective action plans (CAP) and risk-based remediation work plans (RWP) for impacted sites in Indiana and adjacent states.
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Remedial Construction Management
Based on a conceptual remedial plan, Creek Run can prepare detailed engineering drawings and bid specifications for all phases of soil and groundwater remediation projects.  Clear, concise Request for Quote (RFQ) documents are prepared and submitted to multiple, pre-qualified bidders and the quotes are carefully reviewed to ensure cost effectiveness.  Creek Run works closely with selected subcontractors throughout the construction activities.  If requested, Creek Run can prepare applications and acquire air discharge, treated water discharge, and building permits as required.

A Health and Safety Plan (HASP) is prepared before commencement of field operations and strictly adhered to throughout the project.  On-site construction operations are conducted by OSHA 40-hour HAZWOPER-trained subcontractors under the direct supervision of experienced Creek Run personnel.  The Creek Run supervisor can provide verbal or written progress reports as requested by the client (i.e. daily, weekly, or on call).  Remedial construction activities will be fully documented in a Corrective Action Implementation Report (CAIR) submitted within 60 days of completion of the project.  The CAIR will include As-Built drawings, photographs, equipment specifications, and copies of permits and clearances.
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Remediation System Evaluation, Operation, and Maintenance
Creek Run successfully operates a variety of soil and groundwater remediation systems in central and northern Indiana.  Treatment technologies include soil vapor extraction (SVE), air sparge (AS), dual phase extraction (DPE), multiple phase extraction (MPE), pump and treat, biovent, passive/active free product recovery units, and treated water infiltration networks.  Major components within these systems include liquid ring vacuum pumps, regenerative blowers, air strippers, granulated activated carbon vessels, oil/water separators, transfer pumps, rotary vane sparge compressors, air compressors, pneumatic groundwater pumps, and assorted manifolds, flow meters, and sensors.  All Creek Run remediation systems are equipped with a programmable logic controller (PLC) to allow remote monitoring of operations.

Creek Run engineers and technicians are skilled in troubleshooting equipment malfunctions, determining if remedial components can be repaired or need to be replaced, and performing the necessary repairs or replacements to restore systems to full operation.  Once a system is operational, Creek Run professionals fine-tune surface and subsurface remedial components to maximize system performance (i.e. increase run time and the rate of contaminant removal). 

In addition to troubleshooting equipment problems and restoring remediation systems to operational status, Creek Run can provide regularly scheduled operation and maintenance (O&M) services to keep systems operating efficiently.  Our extensive, ongoing operations require Creek Run to maintain close working relationships with system builders, equipment manufacturers, and other remedial service providers.  These long-term relationships allow Creek Run to access specialized remedial experts and obtain preferential pricing for components and supplies – factors that can benefit your remedial efforts.
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Groundwater Monitoring
Most regulatory agencies require periodic sampling of groundwater monitoring well networks during site investigation and corrective action activities, usually on a quarterly basis.  Since accurate groundwater monitoring data is vital for eventually obtaining closure, every groundwater monitoring event must be conducted in a manner that ensures validity of the results.

Creek Run currently conducts groundwater monitoring at over 30 facilities in conjunction with on-going investigation and remedial programs.  Our highly-trained staff of geologists and environmental scientists monitors active and former UST sites, AST bulk plants, and related facilities.  Monitoring activities include precise measurement of static water levels and free product thickness in wells, collection of groundwater samples for field testing and laboratory analysis, and documentation of the physical condition of monitoring wells and protective covers.  Sampling parameters include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), poly-nuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals, and monitored natural attenuation (MNA) indicator parameters (dissolved oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, ferrous iron, oxidation/reduction potential, and hydrogen sulfide).

At Creek Run, groundwater monitoring activities are conducted in accordance with requirements of the applicable regulatory program following strict quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures.  Creek Run personnel routinely conduct groundwater monitoring events in the presence of regulatory personnel, including representatives of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Section, State Cleanup Program (SCP), and Voluntary Remediation Program (VRP). 

Concise, user-friendly groundwater monitoring reports prepared by Creek Run include a detailed description of sample collection and processing procedures, tabulated groundwater elevation data and laboratory analytical results, a groundwater flow map, a map depicting analytical results and the extent of impacted groundwater, laboratory reports, and field data sheets.  For active remediation sites, monitoring reports also include system operation data and the amount of contaminants recovered during the reporting period.
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Report Review and Regulatory Status Appraisal
Actual and perceived environmental impacts can drastically affect the value of a property.  Therefore, environmental reports must be complete, accurate, and present a realistic interpretation of the regulatory status of the property.  A second opinion on the adequacy of technical reports and relevant regulatory issues can be invaluable to a decision maker.  Over 40 years of cumulative environmental and regulatory experience provide Creek Run project managers with an outstanding ability to evaluate the adequacy of environmental reports prepared by other consultants, identify significant data gaps and their consequences, and verify the regulatory status of impacted properties.  Creek Run personnel routinely review a wide variety of environmental reports {Phase I ESAs, Phase II ESAs, Initial Site Characterizations (ISCs), Corrective Action Plans (CAPs), Remediation Work Plans (RWPs)} and prepare impartial assessments of their technical accuracy, conformity to standard report formats required by applicable regulatory entities, and likelihood of regulatory approval. 
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Mapping and Drafting Services
Recent upgrades in computer hardware and software allow Creek Run to provide mapping and drafting services to lenders, developers, consultants, and others who require clear, accurate, and user-friendly site maps.  These services are provided by Creek Run personnel under the direction of our Chief Draftsman, Randy Newton who has over 20 years of experience in the drafting and engineering fields. 

All drawings are created using AutoCAD LT software.  Drawings can be produced at the desired scale on 8 ½” x 11”, 11” x 17”, 18” x 24”, or 24” x 36” paper.  Creek Run can use your standard border drawing and symbols, if available, or create them for you.  Drawings and other information can be quickly transmitted electronically via e-mail or fax.  Hard copies of documents can be delivered next day via Federal Express or UPS.

Examples of mapping and drafting services Creek Run can provide include:

Site Mapping - Documents are generated by an on site visit to visually observe and field measure/photograph the subject property.  If available, aerial photography, architectural/survey plans, legal description, etc., will be used to refine the site map.  While not a legal survey document, site maps produced by Creek Run are highly accurate representations of the physical layout of the properties drawn with the degree of detail required to meet client needs.

Environmental - Documents unique to environmental consulting are created by working directly with clients/project managers/field technicians to present information obtained from environmental investigation and remediation activities.  Environmental drawings produced by Creek Run include: groundwater flow maps; soil and groundwater analytical summary maps; soil boring logs; well construction diagrams; and geological cross-sections.

System Design/Mechanical - Design drawings presenting concise remedial and construction information are created by working closely with clients and project managers.  Design drawings prepared by Creek Run include: conceptual design layouts; mechanical and plumbing details; building and trailer layouts; and completed as-built diagrams.

These are just a few examples of the drafting services Creek Run can provide.  Please contact Randy Newton at rnewton@creekrun.com for more information on mapping and drafting services.
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Excess Liability Trust Fund
Creek Run L.L.C. Environmental Engineering provides a full range of services designed to maximize reimbursement of costs associated with investigation and remediation of releases from eligible underground storage tanks (USTs).  Although specializing in the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) Excess Liability Trust Fund (ELTF), Creek Run personnel are familiar with other cost recovery options and UST reimbursement programs in adjacent states.  Our Claims Coordinator can quickly determine eligibility for recovery of environmental costs from a variety of programs, gather pertinent backup documentation, prepare a claim for submittal, track the claim during the review process, and follow up with the reviewer to expedite processing of the claim.  Our Claims Coordinator maintains close contact with claim reviewers throughout the process and, in the event that apparently eligible costs are denied, can prepare and submit the appropriate appeal documents with in the required time period.  To date, Creek Run has completed over 200 claims with an average ELTF reimbursement rate of 96%.

If you are interested determining the status of your project with regard to cost recovery or have questions about the process, please feel free to contact the Creek Run Claims Coordinator.
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